Welcome To Prince Edward County Wineries!

 

Hi,  Thanks for stopping by.  My name is Joe and I moved to Prince Edward County several years ago. 

 

Why? 

 

The Prince Edward County Wineries of course!  There are almost 45 wineries within a 45 minute drive of where I live!

 

My plan is to do features such as video tours of the actual wineries and reviews of the individual wines produced in the Prince Edward County Wineries.

 

So, bookmark this and plan on keeping up to date as I explore some fantastic wineries!

 

And if you see me driving around the county stop me for some free tasting tickets at local wineries!

 

Joe Haché

 

email me ... jhache@gmail.com



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WineSpectator.com: Q&A's

What are synthetic wine corks made of? (Wine Spectator)
Dear Dr. Vinny, What are synthetic wine corks made of? —Adrian, United Kingdom Dear Adrian, The two main types of synthetic corks are made from either petrochemical-based plastics or plant-based plastics. The petrochemical-based plastics are made from low-density polyethylene, a pliable type of plastic. Plastic pellets are melted down, and then turned into a foam consistency so they’ll mimic natural cork’s spongy texture, typically then covered with a smooth outer skin. The plant-based plastic corks are similar in production, except that they are made from biopolyethylene, a type of renewable polyethylene that’s made from ethanol derived from the dehydration process of raw materials like sugarcane and sugar beets. The plant-based synthetics are increasing in popularity, since they have a low carbon footprint and are renewable. Bioplastics like these are also commonly used to make water and soda bottles. Why do some wineries choose synthetics over traditional natural corks, screwcaps or composites? Synthetic corks are cheap: They cost about a dime to 15 cents each, about the same as a composite cork; screwcaps can cost up to 25 cents, and good-quality natural corks can cost anywhere from 75 cents to $2. Some folks opt for synthetic corks to eliminate the risk of "cork taint," or the potential for irregularities that arises from using a natural product like cork. I don’t mind synthetic corks, but they can be really hard to get out of the bottle—they can be so stiff sometimes that I’ve actually broken a corkscrew on a couple of them. I’ve also heard anecdotal reports that wine aged for a long time (years) under synthetic cork can take on some off odors or flavors that may be linked to the plastic. —Dr. Vinny
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If I buy bottles of wine to take home from a tasting room, is it customary to tip on those? (Wine Spectator)
Dear Dr. Vinny, When visiting a winery for a tasting, I always tip the server in the tasting room. If I buy bottles to take home, is it customary to tip on those as well? —Connie, Fredericksburg, Texas Dear Connie, Tasting room experiences vary, from simple belly-up-to-the-bar tastings to much more informative sit-down experiences, and the expected etiquette can vary as well. Overall, I’d say that tipping at wineries isn’t expected or necessary, but if you get good service, it’s very kind of you to hand someone a $5, $10 or $20 bill, depending on the size of your party, the duration of your tasting and the quality of the service. But no, you do not need to provide an additional tip on any bottles of wine that you purchase to take home. Back in the olden days, tastings were usually free, with the hope/expectation that you’d buy a bottle of wine. With the addition of fees, the expectation that you'll buy a bottle seems to have faded. But pay attention to your tab: Some wineries may include a gratuity on the bill. And if you’re not sure, it’s always OK to ask. —Dr. Vinny
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What’s the difference between Bordeaux and Burgundy? And are they interchangeable when it comes to cooking and recipes? (Wine Spectator)
Dear Dr. Vinny, What’s the difference between Bordeaux and Burgundy? And if I use a Bordeaux red wine in a recipe that calls for Burgundy, will that affect the taste of the dish? —Katherine, Phoenix, Md. Dear Katherine, Bordeaux and Burgundy are both wine regions in France. In Europe, wines are typically referred to by their designated geographic origin (Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée, or A.O.C., in France; Denominazione di Origine Controllata, or D.O.C., in Italy, etc.) rather than by what grape they're made of. For instance, Bordeaux, Burgundy and Champagne are all actual places in addition to being the terms we use to refer to the wines from those places. Bordeaux’s red wines are largely based on the Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot grapes, along with Cabernet Franc, Petit Verdot and Malbec. Bordeaux whites are usually blends of Sauvignon Blanc and Sémillon. Meanwhile, Burgundy’s red wines are made from Pinot Noir (the Beaujolais region is technically considered part of Burgundy as well, and the red wines there are made from Gamay), while white Burgundies are made from the Chardonnay grape. You asked about cooking with red wine, so let me speak in very broad terms here. The wines of Bordeaux and Burgundy are quite different. Generally, red Bordeauxs will be bigger, heavier and more tannic or drying than wines from Burgundy. I’d expect purple fruit, tobacco and anise flavors in Bordeaux, while Burgundies should show off red fruit flavors, spice and fresh earth notes. As far as substituting for each other in cooking? I think that depends. If it’s just a splash of red wine, it probably doesn’t matter. But if you’re making coq au vin with an entire bottle of wine, well, that would change the flavor profile a bit. Pinot Noir’s red fruit flavors are ideal pairings with the bacon and mushrooms in that dish, and that might be lost by substituting a red Bordeaux. I’d recommend substituting another Pinot Noir if you don't have any red Burgundy available. —Dr. Vinny
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Is there a universal wineglass style I can use for red and white wines? (Wine Spectator)
Dear Dr. Vinny, I’m having a big party and want to serve red and white wine, but I only want to use one type of wineglass. What do you suggest? —Leslieann, Brooklyn, N.Y. Dear Leslieann, I think an all-purpose set of quality glassware is a terrific investment for wine lovers, because it will help you enjoy your wine. There are a lot of variables and brands and specialty glasses out there, but nice options start at about $15 a glass, and less if you're buying a set (or take advantage of holiday sales). If your budget can go up to $20 or $25, you’ll have even more options. I don’t have an endorsement deal with a wineglass company yet, so I’ll just give you some general advice. Most important, look for glasses with a thin rim. I used to recommend hand-blown glass, but there’s been a lot of advancement in machine-made glasses in recent years, so there are more options now. For a single, all-purpose shape, I’d recommend a tall Bordeaux-style glass (versus the wider-bowled Burgundy styles). I find this shape works well with a wide range of wines, including sparkling and dessert-style wines. I like that they’re a little easier to handle and swirl. They should taper in slightly at the top to concentrate the aromas. I wouldn’t pick anything smaller than 10 ounces—my all-purpose glasses hold more than 20 ounces, but I am an absent-minded swirler, and a bit of a klutz sometimes. Those glasses keep the wine in my glass and not on the tablecloth. If you can, try to hold them in your hand first to see how they feel, and imagine you’ll have about a third of the glass full of wine. Will you be able to do a healthy swirl without spilling? Does it feel balanced? Or is it too top-heavy? I’m not a fan of stemless wineglasses because fingerprint smudges drive me nuts, but they are a good option for households with limited cupboard space or excitable tail-wagging dogs. They're certainly easier to fit in the dishwasher. I’ve found that wineglasses are a deeply personal choice. I have a couple of specialty glasses that represent the types of wines I drink most often, and Champagne flutes that I like to hand out to guests when they arrive (but some of my colleagues have convinced me that sparkling wine is best enjoyed in a larger glass). If it’s within your budget to expand your collection, have fun. I’ve been lucky enough to sit through a few wineglass seminars to know that there’s some science behind all of those shapes, and they can matter. But please treat yourself to some good basic glasses. I remember the first time I set a table and everyone had the same wineglass. I felt like I unlocked an impressive adulting achievement. —Dr. Vinny
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Is it OK to store wine upright if it has a screwcap? (Wine Spectator)
Dear Dr. Vinny, If a bottle of wine has a twist-off cap, is it OK to store it upright? —David Dear David, The primary reason that wine bottles sealed with natural corks are stored on their sides is to keep the cork moist, so that it doesn't dry out and shrink. Screwcaps don't need to be kept moist to remain effective, so yes, it's OK to store wine with a twist-off cap upright. But you should still follow the same general principles of good wine storage, including protecting the wine from light and vibration and keeping it at a steady, cool temperature. Since I like to store all of my wine together, I keep the screwcaps on their sides in the racks with the rest of my bottles. —Dr. Vinny
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